St. John Vianney High School

K. Walsh's Modern World History Page

French Rev Liberty

World History II
Mr. Kevin W. Walsh

World history is an essential element in any social studies curriculum. The study of the history of the world, the differing perspectives, and interests of its members give students greater insights into the modern world. This course will focus on the theme of CONFLICT. This course will develop on the themes of political, religious, economic, and social conflict experienced by members of the global community from the development of nation-states in the fifteenth century to the end of the second millennium and the growth of a global economy.
Course Outcomes
Students will be able to:
1. Identify major historical events in the history of the world from the fifteenth to the end of the twentieth century.
2. Place major events of world history in chronological order.
3. Trace and analyze political, religious, economic, and social conflict in the history of the world from the fifteenth century to the present.
4. Understand the causes of various global conflicts and the effects the conflicts had on the region of the world.
5. Demonstrate their understanding of various concepts, events, and cultures through creative use o technology, primary source documents, projects, and presentations.

Content
Conflict is the central theme of this course. The class will focus on political, religious, economic, and social conflict in their study of the following units:
1. The Beginnings of the Modern World
-Review Renaissance and Reformation (Chapter 15 sections 1 and 3)
The Age of Exploration (Chapter 16 sections 1-4)

2. Expansion of the Modern World
-The Age of Enlightenment and American Revolution (Chapter 19 sections 1-3)
The French Revolution and Napoleon (Chapter 20 section 1-4)
-The Industrial Revolution (Chapter 21 section 1-3)
-Era of Reform (Chapter 22 section 1-3)

3. Political Philosophies of the 19th Century
-Liberalism vs. Conservatism (Chapter 23 section 1 and 2)
-Nationalism (Chapter 24 section 1-4)
-Imperialism (Chapter 25 section 1-4)

4. Modern World in Crisis
-World War I (Chapter 26 section 1-4)
-World Between the Wars (Chapter 27 section 2 and 4)
-World War II (Chapter 28 section 1-4)

5. The World After 1945
-Cold War (Chapter 29 section 1-4)
-The World After the Cold War (Chapter 30 section 1-4)

 


World History II
Mr. Kevin W. Walsh

World history is an essential element in any social studies curriculum. The study of the history of the world, the differing perspectives, and interests of its members give students greater insights into the modern world. This course will focus on the theme of CONFLICT. This course will develop on the themes of political, religious, economic, and social conflict experienced by members of the global community from the development of nation-states in the fifteenth century to the end of the second millennium and the growth of a global economy.

Course Outcomes
Students will be able to:
1. Identify major historical events in the history of the world from the fifteenth to the end of the twentieth century.
2. Place major events of world history in chronological order.
3. Trace and analyze political, religious, economic, and social conflict in the history of the world from the fifteenth century to the present.
4. Understand the causes of various global conflicts and the effects the conflicts had on the region of the world.
5. Demonstrate their understanding of various concepts, events, and cultures through creative use o technology, primary source documents, projects, and presentations.

Content
Conflict is the central theme of this course. The class will focus on political, religious, economic, and social conflict in their study of the following units:
1. The Beginnings of the Modern World
-Review Renaissance and Reformation (Chapter 15 sections 1 and 3)
The Age of Exploration (Chapter 16 sections 1-4)

2. Expansion of the Modern World
-The Age of Enlightenment and American Revolution (Chapter 19 sections 1-3)
The French Revolution and Napoleon (Chapter 20 section 1-4)
-The Industrial Revolution (Chapter 21 section 1-3)
-Era of Reform (Chapter 22 section 1-3)

3. Political Philosophies of the 19th Century
-Liberalism vs. Conservatism (Chapter 23 section 1 and 2)
-Nationalism (Chapter 24 section 1-4)
-Imperialism (Chapter 25 section 1-4)

4. Modern World in Crisis
-World War I (Chapter 26 section 1-4)
-World Between the Wars (Chapter 27 section 2 and 4)
-World War II (Chapter 28 section 1-4)

6. The World After 1945
-Cold War (Chapter 29 section 1-4)
-The World After the Cold War (Chapter 30 section 1-4)

Texts
World History: Human Legacy. Ramirez, Stearns, and Wineberg. Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Austin, Texas. 2008

Supplemental Reading
All Quiet on the Western Front. Erich Maria Remarque.

Materials Needed
These materials are to brought to every class period
1. Textbook
2. Three- ring binder
3. Loose-leaf paper
4. Pen and pencil
Grading
You will receive one grade at the end of the semester. The grade will be calculated by dividing your points earned by the total possible points available for the semester.
Unit Tests
After each unit of study there will be a Unit Test. The test will consist of objective questions (multiple choice, labeling, matching, true/false) as well as essay, short answer, and identify questions.
-Each test will be worth 100 points

Unit Document Based Essay
During each unit, you will be assigned a document based question (DBQ) to answer in essay form. Students will receive a packet of documents (quotes, maps, cartoons, data), the students will analyze the documents and answer the essay question in 5 paragraph essay form.
Each unit portfolio will be worth 50 points

Family History Project
Every student in class will be required to research their family and personal history through personal interviews, photographs, and videos. The required paper must be 4-5 pages and include 2 sections. Section 1 is your personal autobiography; Section 2 is your family history. Each student is required to bring in visual examples of their family history.
The family history project is worth 150 points.

Digital Media Creation
Students will be asked to create a digital comic book that can be created and shared on line to express comprehension and understanding of the Age of Revolution. This will be a group project. More details to follow.
This digital media creation will be worth 100 points.

Research Paper
Every student in class will be required to complete a 4-6 page research paper answering a historical question. Each paper must be properly researched and properly documented to earn credit for the paper. More information on the paper will be forthcoming.
The research paper is worth 200 points

Technology Projects
Throughout the course of the semester, the students will be asked to complete technology based projects as individuals and as groups. The students will be taught to use technology such as Animoto, Thinglink, Pixon

Homework and Quizzes
Most daily homework is in the form of reading and note taking, although other daily homework assignments may be given. Most daily reading quizzes will be given with students allowed to use their notes over the previous night's reading assignment. Quizzes will normally be worth 10 points. Homework assignments will be worth 10 points. These points will be added into your total points for the semester.

Your grade will be a cumulative grade of all your work. We will take your total points earned and divide the total points possible to determine your average

Absent From Class?
Late Work
- Students will have the number of days they were absent to make up missed work
e.g. If John is absent on Tuesday, returns on Wednesday, his assignments from Tuesday are due on Thursday.

Daily attendance is required for academic success. Our discussions and in-class activities are vital to mastering the concepts of this class. Therefore, it is a must that you attend class. If you are absent, please check the file holder at the front of the classroom for any documents that you need to help understand the information from class. Each day, the instructor will place the information in the file for the corresponding day of the month.
- If a student is unable to complete missed work in the appropriate time frame or is absent for an extended period of time, it is essential he communicate his needs to the teacher.
- If you want to get your work before you return please log into my blog at:
http://kwalsh-history.blogspot.com

Encore
Encore is an unstructured period where students may:
- visit teachers to get help in a subject; visit teachers to get make up work; to arrange make up tests and quizzes; work on projects; meet with clubs organizations, or activities; meet with counselors, campus minister, coordinators, administrators, etc.
The teacher may continue the class period into Encore.

If you ever need to get in contact with me, e-mail me at kwalsh@vianney.com or call (314) 965-4853 ext. 276.